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You are cordially invited to a RIPS seminar scheduled for this Thursday, 15th November, 2018:
 
Title: Career pathways in Demography: What careers in demography are possible following training at RIPS?
 
Speaker: Dr Tetteh Dugbaza, Executive Officer and Senior Analyst, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Australia
 
Date: Thursday, 15th November, 2018
Venue: RIPS Lecture Room
Time: 2PM


BRIEF BIOGRAPHY OF SPEAKER

Dr Tetteh Dugbaza is a former student of the Regional Institute of Population Studies (RIPS). He holds a BA honours degree from the University of Cape Coast, a graduate diploma and MA degree in population studies from the University of Ghana, and a Ph. D in Demography from the Australian National University.

Dr Dugbaza is currently senior analyst and executive at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).  The AIHW is the leading health and welfare statistics agency in Australia. It is also a leading research agency in population health in Australia. Dr Dugbaza has had a varied and interesting career with the AIHW, the Australian Bureau of Statistics, and the United Nations Population Fund, in various capacities as senior researcher, Chief Technical Adviser, and senior analyst and executive. His main focus of work has been in the areas of designing and implementing demographic and health surveys, fertility, mortality and life expectancy analysis, Indigenous population identification, population projections and modelling of economic hardship within the population. He is currently working on two projects on child mortality and modelling of the risk factors associated with adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes in Australia.